What’s The Time?

Alright, I’ll start with a brief story.

Once upon a time, there was this guy who was walking on the street and didn’t have his phone along with him at the time, and he didn’t even wear a watch, but he had something to do, and for that, he wanted to know the time, so he asked a fellow passerby, “What’s the time?” And the fellow replied, “Good,” and just went away.

Yeah, he was amused too, for a while. Of course, he walked past him and asked some other fellow, and thank gosh, this other fellow normally replied, that is, “It’s 7:20.” Now that’s what he was looking for!

Okay, now, jokes aside, let’s think about it. The fellow who answered ‘good,’ was he wrong? Or was he wrong just because the guy wasn’t looking for the answer that he gave him?

Time has been given so many characteristics with an evolution that none of our talks end without mentioning time at least a couple of times. Sometimes, it’s a good time. Sometimes it isn’t good. There’s time for lunch. Dinner, maybe. Bedtime. Morning. Late. Too late. Due. Payback. It has got so many edges and vertices to it. So flexible that it can almost cover up anything!

But eventually, it all sums up to these three events: Past, present, and future. We’re worried about the future, heavy with the past, and lost in the present. Things fall apart. People break. Minds lose. ‘Cause when all that is happening is good, we don’t have a care in the world about anything else. But when something goes wrong, anything, we start thinking. We raise questions. Blame ourselves, others. Imagine all the possible ways about how it could’ve been gone right. But in the end, we end up blaming it all on time. We curse time for things that went wrong. And for all that ever went wrong, or will. And if somebody stops us at that time and asks, “What’s the time?” We’ll voluntarily say, “Bad.”

Now, am I wrong?

Actually, there is no right or wrong answer to the question, “What’s the time?” We’re all just looking for something, which we probably already know. It won’t make a difference most of the time, but we still need to know it.

When time limits you, it teaches you to prioritize. When times are hard, you get tougher. When it hurts, you learn to heal. When it kills, you learn survival.

Time helps us grow up. It has become way more than a number. It has become a necessity of living, getting better or worse, every day. Changing constantly. It’s gone, it’s still here, it’s coming. And we’ve been living in delusions of its anxiety forever. It’s about time to let it be. Instead of forcing something inevitable to change, we’d rather congregate our energy to be prepared for it. Like right now, it’s time for me to end this one-way conversation, so I iwll give my goodbyes to y’all.

Adios.

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